Learn@SPAS

An overall goal of the Saint Paul American School program is to provide students an authentic American curriculum alongside an intensive Chinese language and culture program. This program will result in two Diplomas, one issued through Saint Paul Preparatory School and one issued by the #2 High School Attached to Beijing Normal University. Our unique location, coupled with a certified American and Chinese staff, allows our program to truly provide students with a unique high school experience.


For more information regarding the vision, curriculums, and courses offered for each subject area, please see the links below.


Graduation Requirements

American Diploma Requirements

Students enrolled in our school will complete courses totaling a minimum of 48 credit hours. Saint Paul American School’s graduation requirements are designed to meet American accreditation standards and entry requirements for a wide range of colleges and universities. St. Paul American School offers 3 different diploma tracks:

College Track Diploma, STEM Track Diploma, or STEM Diploma

Subject area graduation requirements are as follows:

English 8 semester credits (including Speech)
Math 6 semester credits (including Algebra II)
Social Studies 7 semester credits (including courses in Geography, Government, U.S. & World History, and Economics)
Science 6 semester credits (including Biology)
Physical Education 2 semester credits
Health 1 semester credit
Fine/Performing Arts 2 semester credits
Technology 1 semester credit
Engineering 0 semester credit
Foreign Language 6 semester credits (4 must be in the same language)
Elective 9 semester credits (Any credits in the previous categories that exceed the requirements count as elective credits)
English 8 semester credits (including Speech)
Math 8 semester credits (including Algebra II and Pre-Calculus)
Social Studies 7 semester credits (including courses in Geography, Government, U.S. & World History, and Economics)
Science 6 semester credits (including Biology)
Physical Education 2 semester credits
Health 1 semester credit
Fine/Performing Arts 2 semester credits
Technology 2 semester credit
Engineering 2 semester credit
Foreign Language 6 semester credits (4 must be in the same language)
Elective 4 semester credits (Any credits in the previous categories that exceed the requirements count as elective credits)
English 8 semester credits (including Speech)
Math 8 semester credits (including Algebra II and an AP Math)
Social Studies 7 semester credits (including courses in Geography, Government, U.S. & World History, and Economics)
Science 8 semester credits (including Biology and an AP Science)
Physical Education 2 semester credits
Health 1 semester credit
Fine/Performing Arts 2 semester credits
Technology 3 semester credit
Engineering 3 semester credit
Foreign Language 6 semester credits (4 must be in the same language)
Elective 0 semester credits (All credits are assigned in specific areas)

 

 

 

 

Student Support Services


Saint Paul American School recognizes that we have students from a diverse background who come with equally varied abilities. It is our belief that all students have the right to learn, progress and succeed, which can only happen when students are met at their level. We believe that every student learns in their own way and at their own pace. With this in mind, SPAS has established multiple levels of support to meet each students’ unique needs and learning styles.

 

Support Services

  • Re-assessments
  • Drop-in Tutoring
  • Help Center
  • Teacher Office Hours
  • English Corner
  • Supervised Study Hall

Assessments


 

 

 

 

At Saint Paul American School, we use three types of assessment (diagnostic, formative and summative) to support student learning. Our students complete a diagnostic testing known as Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) three times per academic year. MAP is a computer-based adaptive assessment that reveals which academic skills and concepts the student has acquired and which they’re ready to learn.

Formative assessment strategies are used to gauge students' understanding and make adjustments to instruction. Formative assessments serve two purposes in the learning process: 1) concept development to strengthen students’ understanding of a specific topic, and 2) provide the teacher and students information about students' understanding of the lesson/unit so that instruction and learning can be modified for the remainder of the lessons in the unit. Because the classroom is comprised of students with varying English language abilities who need differentiated instruction, formative assessments help diagnose specific needs so that the course can be modified accordingly.

 

At the end of each unit a summative assessment is administered to assess students' ability to understand concepts, perform skills, problem solve, model and/or communicate reasoning.

NWEA Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)


What is the MAP Assessment?

The MAP Assessment is a web-based, computer-adaptive, multiple-choice assessment with questions that automatically adapt to each student’s instructional level based on their responses, independent of the enrolled grade level. The final score is an estimate of the student’s achievement level. This assessment can inform instruction, track student growth over time and project student growth targets.

 

 

What does the MAP Assessment Test?

Reading

  • Literature
  • Informational Text
  • Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

Mathematics

  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • The Real and Complex Number Systems
  • Geometry
  • Statistics and Probability

Language

  • Writing: Plan, Organize, Develop, Revise, Research
  • Language: Understand, Edit Mechanics
  • Language: Understand, Edit for Grammar, Usage

 

 

 

What Information does MAP Provide?

Student Level

  • Compare and predict student achievement and growth over time
  • Measure the growth of every student over time regardless of level
  • Engage students and families in goal-setting
  • Plan for individual instruction
  • Evaluate college readiness with MAP College Readiness Benchmarks alignment to the ACT Test

Class Level

  • Create and reinforce evidence-informed instructional practices
  • Customizes educational materials (based on the results for each student and group) which help teachers improve learning
  • Evaluate classroom instruction and identify teacher professional development needs

School Level

  • Identify school level trends
  • Determine professional development needs
  • Facilitate communication with parents

What does the Score Mean (What is RIT)?

Every item on a MAP assessment is anchored to a vertically aligned equal interval scale, called the RIT—a stable measurement, like inches on a ruler, that covers all grades. RIT scores serve as a data point in a student’s learning plan; educators can use this precise learning level and respond accordingly.

What can MAP tell you about College Readiness?

NWEA did an exhaustive study, following students who took the Reading and Mathematics MAP test from grades 4-9 and comparing the data to the scores those students received on the ACT. As a result, MAP is able to divide students into three groups according to their college readiness; “Not on Track”, “On Track for a 22” and “On Track for a 24”. These categorizations give students targeted goals in the areas that need improvement to help give our students the best possible chance of getting into their dream school.